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Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten is one of the most delicious ways to savor summer’s most beloved fresh fruit. Isn’t it fun to say clafoutis, pronounced (ka-for-tee)? The term is derived from the old Occitan verb Clair, which means “to fill.” Filling a greased baking dish with sliced, juicy peaches surrounded by a gently sweet, milk, egg, and flour mixture. It’s a pillowy pancake-like dish that’s one of the most beloved home-baked sweets in French cuisine.

Why you’ll love this recipe:

  • Real fresh peach flavor: Because there are no chemical extracts or syrups used to produce the peach flavor in this Ina Garten recipe, the true star is the pure, natural taste of fresh peaches.
  • It’s made with basic ingredients like fresh peaches, milk, flour, sugar, egg, and extract.
  • if you are a peach lover you will like this Ina Garten recipe.
  • It’s ideal as a breakfast or dessert dish.
  • It’s a refreshing summer dessert that may be baked or grilled.
  • It’s a pillowy pancake-like dessert that’s one of the most beloved home-baked sweets in French cuisine.

What is clafoutis?

The origins of classic French clafoutis may be traced back to the 19th century in Limousin, France, when the dessert was created with the region’s black cherries (with their pits!). The original was cherry clafoutis, but this version was devised to make the most of any product you had on hand.

You may use any seasonal fruit or a fruit mix – for example, you might substitute half of the peaches with any stone fruit like cherries or plums. Make it with fresh blueberries (maybe with a dash of lemon zest), raspberries, or blackberries instead. Make it with apples or pears and a dash of cinnamon in the fall!

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten
Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

Ingredient That You’ll Need:

Ina Garten Clafoutis is made using simple ingredients. Some replacements are possible, and I’m sure you already have the majority of the items in your cupboard.

  • Eggs: are necessary for this Clafoutis since they are the one component that allows the sliceable custard magic to happen. I haven’t tried a vegan version, but I’m sure there are methods to avoid the egg if you wanted to, but not in this one.
  • Whole milk: some recipes call for cream, while others call for 2 percent – either works, but heavy cream yields a richer, creamier texture. I prefer to travel someplace in the middle. You may also use half and half if you choose to make it dairy-free, I use my favorite alternative milk, and grease the baking dish with coconut oil or vegetable oil instead of butter.
  • Brown sugar: I adore brown sugar with peaches because they simply seem to go together. Alternately, granulated or coconut sugar can be used. I haven’t tried any liquid sweeteners yet.
  • Flavorings: cinnamon and vanilla extract are essential and depending on the fruit, I like to incorporate lemon zest and almond essence as well. A little drink never hurt anyone either. The brandy or bourbon is optional in this recipe; simply leave it out and slice your peaches when ready to use.
  • All-purpose flour: I normally use Bob’s Red Mill’s all-purpose flour, which is always on hand in my cupboard. They always have all of my baking requirements met. Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1-1 All-purpose Flour is my favorite gluten-free alternative. It’s also a pantry staple in my house. It’s the ideal easy and dependable gluten-free option.
  • Peaches: it wouldn’t be a peach clafoutis without them, but you may use any fruit as long as it’s less than 2 cups. If using frozen fruit, I recommend tossing it in a little flour before adding it to the pan or allowing it to defrost completely and drain any excess liquid so that the texture and consistency of the clafoutis are not affected. If you are using canned beans, I would recommend draining them well before adding them to the Ina Garten recipe.

What is the best way to peel a peach?

You’ll need to peel the peaches for this Ina Garten recipe, and let’s be honest: peach peeling isn’t the most fun task.

We seem to have tried every method for peeling a peach, including blanching and peeling with our hands, paring with a knife, and even peeling like a carrot.

While it depends on how ripe your peaches are (and how many you need to deal with), we prefer the blanch and peel approach.

Try each approach and find which one works best for you.

The peach clafoutis is delectable. The light, creamy flan complements the sweetness of the peaches perfectly. The “crust” adds a lot of texture.

It’s also visually appealing. When you have company, this is a great dish to serve. Enjoy! I hope you’re enjoying a fantastic summer.

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten
Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

How To Make Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis?

  1. In a blender, combine the eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, lemon zest, and salt. To blend, pulse a few times. Pulse in the flour until the mixture is smooth. Place the batter in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to rest.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the peaches in half and slice them 1/4 inch thick. Toss the peach slices with the bourbon or brandy and set aside for up to 30 minutes while the batter settles.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Preheat the oven to 350°F and butter a 10-inch round pan, ceramic casserole, or quiche dish.
  4. Set aside the peaches after removing them from the brandy mixture with a slotted spoon. Swirl the remaining bourbon brandy mixture in the mixer to combine. DO NOT MIX AGAIN. 
  5. Carefully remove the heated pan from the oven. Pour the batter in. Arrange peach slices on top. Alternatively, you might arrange the peaches in the pan first, followed by the batter – either method works. Garnish with coarse sugar.
  6. Return the pans to the oven and bake for 40-45 minutes. Alternatively, bake until the top is golden and puffy and the custard has set. Allow cooling somewhat before sprinkling with powdered sugar and serving. Toppings such as vanilla ice cream or whipped cream are excellent choices.

Recipe Tips

  • Make sure your butter or oil the bottom of the pan well so that your clafoutis slices easily and can be simply removed from the pan.
  • Allow the clafoutis batter to cool! Allow it to rest for 30 minutes. This resting period is critical for producing the most delicate clafoutis. After a spin through the blender, the gluten in the flour is tight and requires time to relax so the resultant custard isn’t too rubbery. If you use a gentler whisk to blend the components, the resting period isn’t as important.
  • Clafoutis, like a Dutch baby, is best served fresh from the oven, so bake it close to the time you intend to serve it. Although, oddly, I enjoy a cold slice as well (I adore cold custard), so I guess it’s a matter of preference.
  • If you want to get creative, reserve half or more of the fruit to arrange on top of the batter after you’ve poured it into the pan liquid to make a pattern – this is completely optional.
  • While the oven is heating up, heat your skillet or baking dish to help the clafoutis puff up faster and higher (similar to how you would when you make a dutch baby). Pouring the batter and fruit into the heated pan immediately begins the cooking process, resulting in a wonderfully puffy clafoutis.
  • I like to sprinkle some sugar on the top to help it get extra golden brown and crispy.
  • There’s no need for a blender. Instead, mix the batter by hand in a bowl until frothy.
Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten
Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

What To Serve With Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis?

Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis is usually served warm and sprinkled with powdered sugar here are some serving ideas:

How can I ensure my clafoutis is cooked in the middle?

When people tried the peach clafoutis recipe, they complained that the interior was never fully cooked while the top was charred. We established that her oven temperature was much wrong (don’t worry, you can make it!).


That is why I always recommend purchasing an oven thermometer. It’s a cheap and useful instrument that tells you whether your oven is too hot or too cold and allows you to change the baking temperature and/or time accordingly. Also, if you see that the edges or tops of your clafoutis or cake are browning too quickly, gently cover the top with aluminum foil and continue baking. This will allow the middle to catch up without overheating the rest of the team.

How To Store Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis?

In The Fridge: 

Covered loosely with foil or plastic wrap, Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis will keep in the fridge for 2 to 3 days. We recommend waiting until you are ready to serve your Peach Clafoutis for presentation and to keep everything fresh.

In the Freezer:

 We do not recommend freezing this Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis. Because peaches do not freeze well, they become mushy and watery.

Note: We can’t freeze any recipe with fruits they can get very soggy and ruin the custardy texture.

Can I Reheat Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis?

No, you cannot reheat your Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis since it is best served chilled or at room temperature. The filling will split and turn black when your Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis is warmed.

FAQ Section

How can you tell if the clafoutis is done baking?

How can you know when your peach clafoutis is done? Simple. Insert a knife into the center, and if it comes out clean, remove the clafoutis from the oven and serve.
Is there any more moist batter stuck to it? Then it must be baked for a bit longer.

Can you use frozen peaches in place of fresh ones?

I do not recommend using frozen peach in this recipe this recipe always calls for fresh peach.

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten
Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

Try More Recipes:

Ina Garten Peach Clafoutis Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving

  • Calories 168
  • Total Fat 65g
  • Cholesterol 219mg
  • Sodium 2121mg
  • Potassium 179mg
  • Dietary Fiber 0g
  • Sugars 15g
  • Protein 0g
  • Vitamin A 93%
  • Vitamin C 5%
  • Calcium 66%
  • Iron 1%

Nutrition Facts Source: Source

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten

Difficulty:BeginnerPrep time: 5 minutesCook time: 40 minutesRest time: 30 minutesTotal time:1 hour 25 minutesServings:8 servingsCalories:168 kcal Best Season:Summer

Description

Peach Clafoutis Ina Garten is one of the most delicious ways to savor summer’s most beloved fresh fruit. Isn’t it fun to say clafoutis, pronounced (ka-for-tee)? The term is derived from the old Occitan verb Clair, which means “to fill.” Filling a greased baking dish with sliced, juicy peaches surrounded by a gently sweet, milk, egg, and flour mixture. It’s a pillowy pancake-like dish that’s one of the most beloved home-baked sweets in French cuisine.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In a blender, combine the eggs, milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, lemon zest, and salt. To blend, pulse a few times. Pulse in the flour until the mixture is smooth. Place the batter in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes to rest.
  2. Meanwhile, cut the peaches in half and slice them 1/4 inch thick. Toss the peach slices with the bourbon or brandy and set aside for up to 30 minutes while the batter settles.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Preheat the oven to 350°F and butter a 10-inch round pan, ceramic casserole, or quiche dish.
  4. Set aside the peaches after removing them from the brandy mixture with a slotted spoon. Swirl the remaining bourbon brandy mixture in the mixer to combine. DO NOT MIX AGAIN. 
  5. Carefully remove the heated pan from the oven. Pour the batter in. Arrange peach slices on top. Alternatively, you might arrange the peaches in the pan first, followed by the batter – either method works. Garnish with coarse sugar
  6. Return the pans to the oven and bake for 40-45 minutes. Alternatively, bake until the top is golden and puffy and the custard has set. Allow cooling somewhat before sprinkling with powdered sugar and serving. Toppings such as vanilla ice cream or whipped cream are excellent choices.

Notes

  • Make sure your butter or oil the bottom of the pan well so that your clafoutis slices easily and can be simply removed from the pan.
  • Allow the clafoutis batter to cool! Allow it to rest for 30 minutes. This resting period is critical for producing the most delicate clafoutis. After a spin through the blender, the gluten in the flour is tight and requires time to relax so the resultant custard isn’t too rubbery. If you use a gentler whisk to blend the components, the resting period isn’t as important.
  • Clafoutis, like a Dutch baby, is best served fresh from the oven, so bake it close to the time you intend to serve it. Although, oddly, I enjoy a cold slice as well (I adore cold custard), so I guess it’s a matter of preference.
  • If you want to get creative, reserve half or more of the fruit to arrange on top of the batter after you’ve poured it into the pan liquid to make a pattern – this is completely optional.
  • While the oven is heating up, heat your skillet or baking dish to help the clafoutis puff up faster and higher (similar to how you would when you make a dutch baby). Pouring the batter and fruit into the heated pan immediately begins the cooking process, resulting in a wonderfully puffy clafoutis.
  • I like to sprinkle some sugar on the top to help it get extra golden brown and crispy.
  • There’s no need for a blender. Instead, mix the batter by hand in a bowl until frothy.
Nutrition Facts

Servings 8


Amount Per Serving
Calories 168
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 65g100%
Cholesterol 218mg73%
Sodium 2121mg89%
Potassium 177mg6%
Protein 0g

Vitamin A 93%
Vitamin C 3%
Calcium 66%
Iron 1%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.