Skip to Content

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

This recipe for Italian Pickled Banana Peppers is incredibly simple to make! The tangy taste complements salads, sandwiches, and other dishes.

Do you have banana peppers? Here’s an excellent method to put them to use: Pickled Banana Peppers from Italy! A buddy recently handed over a large bag of banana peppers from the garden. As it turns out, this mild pepper is ideal for pickling. The resulting acidic, garlicky taste is simply delicious! Use these brilliant yellow slices in salads, sandwiches, chili, and other dishes like mild pepperoncini.

What Do Italian Pickled Banana Peppers Taste Like?

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers have a slight heat (occasionally they might be hot) but are acidic thanks to the pickling brine. On their own, they’re acidic and somewhat sweet. Quick Italian Pickled Banana Peppers refrigerated in the refrigerator will keep their crispness.

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers
Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

Ingredients That You’ll Need:

Would you want to prepare a jar of Italian Pickled Banana Peppers? You just need 5 to 6 big peppers. This dish is ideal for using up farm vegetables, but it also works with store-bought peppers. We weren’t sure what to do with our friend’s banana peppers because they came as a surprise. Pickles, on the other hand, are quick and simple to cook and store nicely for future meals.

These Italian Pickled Banana Peppers are fast pickles, sometimes known as refrigerator pickles since they are kept in the refrigerator. While they are not shelf-stable, they are extremely simple to make and do not require any canning equipment! This recipe will require the following ingredients:

  • 1 wide-mouth pint canning jar
  • Banana peppers
  • White vinegar
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Peppercorns
  • Bay leaf

What Is The Difference Between Pepperoncini And Banana Peppers?

Pepperoncini and banana peppers may share a common ancestor in the chili pepper family, but it does not make them interchangeable. When compared to the hottest peppers on the market, such as ghost peppers and habaneros, both of these are rather mild. Although both are sweet peppers, pepperoncini have a much hotter flavor.

When Should You Pick Banana Peppers for Pickling?

If you’re growing banana peppers in your garden, make sure you harvest them at the right time. Always allow banana peppers to ripen before picking them for pickles. They should have a pale golden tint and 4-5 inches in length when ripe.

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers
Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

Are Banana Peppers Spicy?

It is determined by the variety. Banana peppers come in two varieties: sweet banana peppers and fiery banana peppers. The sweet type is quite mild, but the hot variant is medium-hot, somewhat hotter than a jalapeño pepper. Here’s how banana peppers compare to other peppers in terms of Scoville heat units (SHU), a scientific measure of spiciness:

  • Sweet banana pepper: 0 to 500 SHU (No spice)
  • Jalapeno peppers: 2,500 to 8,000 SHU (Medium hot)
  • Hot banana peppers: 5,000 to 10,000 SHU (Medium hot)
  • Serrano peppers: 5,000 to 15,000 SHU (Hot)
  • Cayenne: 90,000 SHU (Very hot)
  • Habanero: 100,000 to 350,000 SHU (Extremely hot)
  • Ghost pepper: 1,041,427 SHU (Outrageously hot)

How To Make Italian Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

  1. In hot soapy water, wash a wide-mouth pint mason jar and its cover. After that, rinse and air dry.
  2. Slice the banana peppers thinly. Fill the jar halfway with the slices.
  3. Peel and cut the garlic cloves lengthwise. Combine the garlic, vinegar, water, sugar, kosher salt, peppercorns, and bay leaf in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring periodically, until the sugar and salt are dissolved (this will take only a few minutes).
  4. When the brine is boiling, pour it into the jar (including the bay leaf). To expel any air bubbles, tap the jar on the counter. If any peppers are exposed at the top, discard any residual brine or top up the jar with more water.
  5. Close the cover securely and set it aside to cool to room temperature (about 1 hour). Refrigerate until ready to serve, or eat right now. Refrigerated for up to 1 month.

Best Ways To Use Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

Of course, the best way to eat Italian Pickled Banana Peppers is straight from the jar! They’re also fantastic for integrating into dishes. Consider them a milder version of pepperoncini (they even look similar). You get all of the tangy flavors without the heat, which is ideal for youngsters or individuals who don’t like spicy cuisine. Here are a few recipes for Italian Pickled Banana Peppers:

  • Add to salads, such as this 7 Layer Salad or this Mexican Street Corn Salad
  • Include a pasta salad, such as Antipasto Salad or Easy Tortellini Salad.
  • Sandwiches, such as the Po Boy Sandwich or the Chickpea Salad Sandwich
  • Serve on a cheese plate or charcuterie board with a Bloody Mary, such as a Classic Bloody Mary or a Caesar.
Italian Pickled Banana Peppers
Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

Can You Can Italian Pickled Banana Peppers?

Yes, however, I no longer can my Italian Pickled Banana Peppers since the peppers weaken when canned. I prefer pepper rings that are crispy. However, the USDA suggests canning them.

How Long Are Italian Pickled Banana Peppers Good For?

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers will keep in the refrigerator for at least a month, and typically up to 6 months. If you want to keep them for a longer period of time, leave out the garlic and run the jar through a water bath for 15 minutes (20 minutes above 6,000 feet elevation, according to USDA guidelines). Allow cooling before storing in a cool, dark location. Processed peppers can be stored for up to two years, but should be refrigerated once opened.

Recipe Tips

  • Pickles made using this recipe should be kept in the fridge, as the name implies. To extend its shelf life, take out the garlic, process the jar in a water bath, and put it in a cold, dry area like the pantry.
  • Toppings and Fixin’s. If you don’t like the seasonings I used on the banana peppers, feel free to substitute your own favorites. Would you say that you have a taste for mustard seeds? Just do it. Do you fancy some oregano, dried? Yes, of course! Some new dill, perhaps? Yes! Absolutely fantastic; my heart skips a beat. Adapt this dish to your tastes.
  • Greatest Pickling Salt. Pickling calls for pure sea salt, kosher salt, or pickling salt. Most salts will perform just fine if they don’t include any other ingredients like anti-clumping agents.
  • The Degree of Crunchiness. Since we don’t boil or otherwise prepare your Italian pickled banana peppers, they’ll maintain their crisp texture even after being bottled. It’s normal for them to lose some of their crispness after being stored, but they’ll still taste great.
  • Vinegar. For this recipe, I use regular white vinegar, but apple cider vinegar might be a nice alternative if you’re looking for something with a sweeter, tangier flavor. It’s been quite useful.
  • Thermal Mass. It’s a common misconception that banana peppers are fiery. However, if you want to give your pickles a little extra kick, you may add some spicy peppers to the mix. The brine will absorb the heat of the pepper and become hotter as a result. I’ve cooked it before with the addition of habanero pepper and found that it gave the whole thing a good kick.

Try More Recipes:

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving

  • Calories 33
  • Total Fat 1g
  • Total Carbohydrate 7g
  • Dietary Fiber 4g
  • Sugars 2g
  • Protein 2g

Nutrition Facts Source: Source

Italian Pickled Banana Peppers

Difficulty:BeginnerPrep time: 15 minutesCook time: 2 minutesRest time: minutesTotal time: 17 minutesServings:1 Can servingsCalories:33 kcal Best Season:Summer

Description

This recipe for Italian Pickled Banana Peppers is incredibly simple to make! The tangy taste complements salads, sandwiches, and other dishes.

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. In hot soapy water, wash a wide-mouth pint mason jar and its cover. After that, rinse and air dry.
  2. Slice the banana peppers thinly. Fill the jar halfway with the slices.
  3. Peel and cut the garlic cloves lengthwise. Combine the garlic, vinegar, water, sugar, kosher salt, peppercorns, and bay leaf in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil, stirring periodically, until the sugar and salt are dissolved (this will take only a few minutes).
  4. When the brine is boiling, pour it into the jar (including the bay leaf). To expel any air bubbles, tap the jar on the counter. If any peppers are exposed at the top, discard any residual brine or top up the jar with more water.
  5. Close the cover securely and set it aside to cool to room temperature (about 1 hour).
  6. Refrigerate until ready to serve, or eat right now. Refrigerated for up to 1 month.

Notes

  • Pickles made using this recipe should be kept in the fridge, as the name implies. To extend its shelf life, take out the garlic, process the jar in a water bath, and put it in a cold, dry area like the pantry.
  • Toppings and Fixin’s. If you don’t like the seasonings I used on the banana peppers, feel free to substitute your own favorites. Would you say that you have a taste for mustard seeds? Just do it. Do you fancy some oregano, dried? Yes, of course! Some new dill, perhaps? Yes! Absolutely fantastic; my heart skips a beat. Adapt this dish to your tastes.
  • Greatest Pickling Salt. Pickling calls for pure sea salt, kosher salt, or pickling salt. Most salts will perform just fine if they don’t include any other ingredients like anti-clumping agents.
  • The Degree of Crunchiness. Since we don’t boil or otherwise prepare your Italian pickled banana peppers, they’ll maintain their crisp texture even after being bottled. It’s normal for them to lose some of their crispness after being stored, but they’ll still taste great.
  • Vinegar. For this recipe, I use regular white vinegar, but apple cider vinegar might be a nice alternative if you’re looking for something with a sweeter, tangier flavor. It’s been quite useful.
  • Thermal Mass. It’s a common misconception that banana peppers are fiery. However, if you want to give your pickles a little extra kick, you may add some spicy peppers to the mix. The brine will absorb the heat of the pepper and become hotter as a result. I’ve cooked it before with the addition of habanero pepper and found that it gave the whole thing a good kick.
Keywords:Italian Pickled Banana Peppers
Nutrition Facts

Servings 1 Can


Amount Per Serving
Calories 33
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 1g2%
Total Carbohydrate 7g3%
Dietary Fiber 4g16%
Sugars 2g
Protein 2g4%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.