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Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

These traditional Alton Brown Southern Biscuits are light and delicate, and go well with a slice of ham, melted butter, and honey, your favorite jam, or covered in country gravy!

This article has a plethora of information to help you create the most delicious Southern Biscuit recipe ever.

Why you’ll love this recipe:

  • Alton Brown’s handmade Southern Buttermilk Biscuits are flaky and delicate.
  • Once you’ve mastered this Alton Brown recipe, you’ll be able to create your own scratch-made biscuits in less time than it takes to open a can.
  • With only a few steps, you can master the art of making biscuits. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t enjoy these biscuits.
  • If you’re seeking the perfect biscuit recipe, try this Alton Brown Southern Buttermilk Biscuit recipe.
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

What Is A Biscuit?

In the United States and Canada, a biscuit is a tiny slice of fast bread with a somewhat hard, dry crust and a soft, crumbly center after baking. They are manufactured with baking powder as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast and are sometimes referred to as baking powder biscuits to distinguish them from other forms. They are typically served with butter or other condiments, spiced with other seasonings or mixed with other types of food to produce sandwiches or other meals, just like other types of bread.

Ingredients That You’ll Need:

  • Flour: White Lily self-rising flour is combined with leavening and salt to make light-textured, flaky biscuits for this Alton Brown Southern Biscuit self-rising flour can also be used to make pancakes, muffins, waffles, coffee cakes, and fast loaves.
  • Vegetable Shortening: I use vegetable shortening as packed is often used in place of butter or lard in baking or for greasing pans vegetable shortening is solid at room temperature, resembling the texture of butter but with virtually no flavor or odor so It so good choice for this Alton Brown Southern Biscuits.
  • Buttermilk: I use Buttermilk. Traditionally, the liquid is leftover after churning butter from cultured cream so I use it in this Alton Brown recipe to pour all ingredients
  • Butter: is a magic ingredient for any biscuit toping it get it that gold-brown fancy color.

What Is the Best Flour for Biscuits?

Self-rising flour, which already contains salt and baking powder, is the finest option for generating delicate, country gravy-worthy biscuits.

Southern cooks swear by White Lily, a brand of self-rising flour originating in the South and made from soft red winter wheat, which is widely cultivated in the region. This flour has a fine texture and a low protein level, which results in fluffy, light-baked items.

Because I can’t locate White Lily in my local supermarket, I purchase it online.

If you can’t locate White Lily flour, don’t worry—any sort of self-rising flour will create a good biscuit; it simply won’t be as delicate as a White Lily biscuit. If you’re a biscuit perfectionist or want to offer your new Southern neighbor a real welcome basket, White Lily flour is a must-have.

Other self-rising flour brands aren’t as fine as White Lily. During my testing, I discovered that dough produced with White Lily was wetter, somewhat stickier, and took less time to bake.

If you use a flour brand other than White Lily:

  • To properly moisten the dough, add one additional tablespoon of buttermilk. It’s going to be sticky.
  • Bake for 15 minutes instead of the 12 minutes specified in the recipe.
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

How To Make Alton Brown Southern Biscuit?

  1. Preheat and prepare the oven: Preheat the oven to 475°F. Keep a little amount of flour in a shallow dish adjacent to the dough.
  2. Cut in the shortening: In a large mixing bowl, combine the remaining flour and the shortening. With a pastry cutter or two forks, cut the shortening into the flour until it is the size of tiny peas and completely covered in flour.
  3. To make the dough: slowly pour the buttermilk in circles around the bowl, fluffing the flour with a fork as you go. Stir with a fork until the flour is soaked and the dough seems shaggy. You will have some flour that is loose. That’s all right. Overworked dough results in thick biscuits.
  4. Knead the dough: Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it 5 or 6 times gently. It will all fall into place. Shape it into a 7-inch circle with your hands that is approximately an inch thick.
  5. To make the biscuits, dredge a 3-inch biscuit cutter in flour in a shallow dish. The biscuits should then be cut out. Lift up after pushing straight down. Don’t twitch. It has the potential to squeeze the sides together and obstruct the rising.
  6. Gather the leftover dough bits by hand to make the last biscuit or two. Refrain from kneading and rolling out the dough again.
  7. Remove the biscuits from the oven and brush the tops with melted butter while still hot.
  8. Remove the biscuits from the pan and set them aside to cool on a baking rack. Alternatively, eat them right away since hot biscuits are wonderful and delightful!

Recipe Tips

When a recipe contains so few components, its success is determined by the quality of the ingredients and the technique employed to combine them. Use low protein, self-rising flour, vegetable shortening, or butter to make fluffy biscuits, and don’t overwork the dough.

  • Pour the buttermilk slowly into the flour, mixing it together with a fork. Before you knead the dough, it will seem shaggy.
  • Knead the dough five or six times to bring it together. That’s it.
  • Roll it out lightly with a rolling pin or press it into an inch-thick circle with your fingertips.
  • If you knead the leftovers again after cutting the biscuits, the biscuits will be tough. Simply gather the leftovers, shape them into a biscuit shape, and aim for a rustic aesthetic.
  • When you place the biscuits on the baking sheet, they should be touching. This aids their ascension.
  • The biscuits will be pale in color. The bottom will be darker, but not crisp or hard. They should have a faint, almost golden tint on top and be easy to rip in two.
  • While the biscuits are still hot, brush them with butter.
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

What To Serve With Alton Brown Southern Biscuit?

homemade fluffy hot Alton Brown Southern Biscuits are delicious right out of the oven, but they’re also a flexible meal that may be served sweet or savory.

  • They’re delicious with eggs and ham in the morning, slathered in country gravy, or served with your breakfast scramble.
  • Leftover biscuits make hearty breakfast sandwiches and are delicious with  Chicken And Sweet Potato for lunch.
  • They can be served with butter and Peach Jam or made into a dessert by topping with fresh strawberries and whipped cream. You can also fill them with Peach Clafoutis or Chia Seed Pudding for a quick hand pie of sorts.

How To Store Alton Brown Southern Biscuit?

  • In-Room Temperature: You could have an Alton Brown Southern biscuit or two leftovers, store them on your countertop in an airtight jar for up to five days.
  • In The Fridge: Don’t store your Alton Brown Southern biscuit in the fridge, or they will dry out.
  • In The Freezer: Place the totally cooled Alton Brown Southern biscuit in a zip-top bag in a single layer. Remove as much air from the bag as possible and freeze it for up to three months.

How To Reheat Alton Brown Southern Biscuit?

Place your Alton Brown Southern biscuit on a baking pan and set it aside. Place the biscuits in a 250°F oven for 10 minutes if they are at room temperature and 25 minutes if they are frozen.

 FAQ Section

What’s the difference between Southern biscuits and regular biscuits?

So there you have it: Southern biscuits have more butter and acidity (from the buttermilk), which results in extremely fluffy and flaky biscuits. Scones, on the other hand, rely on richer, denser components such as heavy cream and eggs to create a robust, yet flaky, crust. You can’t go wrong with any of these options for breakfast.

What Fat Makes the Best Biscuits?

Cold butter or room temperature organic vegetable shortening are my two favorite fats for biscuits. Although butter produced a lovely, fluffy biscuit, it did not rise as high or provide as many flaky layers as vegetable shortening. (I also tried lard and had great hopes, but the lard biscuits were tasteless and colorless.)

Can You Substitute All-Purpose Flour?

If you don’t have self-rising flour on hand and the thought of going to the shop makes you feel like Jack Nicholson in The Shining, you may use all-purpose flour instead. All-purpose flour is often made out of a combination of hard and soft wheat flour. It will still make a good biscuit, but it will be thicker than self-rising flour biscuits.

Alton Brown Southern Biscuit
Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

Try More Recipes:

Alton Brown Southern Biscuit Nutrition Facts

Amount Per Serving

  • Calories 130
  • Total Fat 6g
  • Saturated Fat 2g
  • Cholesterol 0mg
  • Sodium 380mg
  • Total Carbohydrate 17g
  • Dietary Fiber 1g
  • Sugars 0.5g
  • Protein 2g
  • Vitamin A 0%
  • Vitamin C 0%
  • Calcium 2%
  • Iron 6%

Nutrition Facts Source: Source

Alton Brown Southern Biscuit

Difficulty:BeginnerPrep time: 5 minutesCook time: 12 minutesRest time: minutesTotal time: 17 minutesServings:4 servingsCalories:130 kcal Best Season:Available

Description

These traditional Alton Brown Southern Biscuits are light and delicate, and go well with a slice of ham, melted butter, and honey, your favorite jam, or covered in country gravy!

Ingredients

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 475°F. Keep a little amount of flour in a shallow dish adjacent to the dough.
  2.  In a large mixing bowl, combine the remaining flour and the shortening. With a pastry cutter or two forks, cut the shortening into the flour until it is the size of tiny peas and completely covered in flour.
  3. slowly pour the buttermilk in circles around the bowl, fluffing the flour with a fork as you go. Stir with a fork until the flour is soaked and the dough seems shaggy. You will have some flour that is loose. That’s all right. Overworked dough results in thick biscuits.
  4. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead it 5 or 6 times gently. It will all fall into place. Shape it into a 7-inch circle with your hands that is approximately an inch thick.
  5. dredge a 3-inch biscuit cutter in flour in a shallow dish. The biscuits should then be cut out. Lift up after pushing straight down. Don’t twitch. It has the potential to squeeze the sides together and obstruct the rising.
  6. Gather the leftover dough bits by hand to make the last biscuit or two. Refrain from kneading and rolling out the dough again.
  7. Remove the biscuits from the oven and brush the tops with melted butter while still hot.
  8. Remove the biscuits from the pan and set them aside to cool on a baking rack. Alternatively, eat them right away since hot biscuits are wonderful and delightful!

Notes

  • Pour the buttermilk slowly into the flour, mixing it together with a fork. Before you knead the dough, it will seem shaggy.
  • Knead the dough five or six times to bring it together. That’s it.
  • Roll it out lightly with a rolling pin or press it into an inch-thick circle with your fingertips.
  • If you knead the leftovers again after cutting the biscuits, the biscuits will be tough. Simply gather the leftovers, shape them into a biscuit shape, and aim for a rustic aesthetic.
  • When you place the biscuits on the baking sheet, they should be touching. This aids their ascension.
  • The biscuits will be pale in color. The bottom will be darker, but not crisp or hard. They should have a faint, almost golden tint on top and be easy to rip in two.
  • While the biscuits are still hot, brush them with butter.
Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 4

Servings 4


Amount Per Serving
Calories 130
Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 6g10%
Saturated Fat 2g10%
Trans Fat 2g
Cholesterol 0mg
Sodium 379mg16%
Total Carbohydrate 17g6%
Dietary Fiber 1g4%
Sugars 0.5g
Protein 2g4%

Vitamin A 0%
Vitamin C -2%
Calcium 2%
Iron 3%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily value may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.